Taking a stand to improve youth sports

SPORT New Zealand along with five major sports (Cricket, Football, Hockey, Netball and Rugby) has announced they are collectively taking a stand to bring the fun back to sport for our tamariki.  

There is an overemphasis with Primary and Intermediate aged children on winning and early specialisation which is what is turning many of our young people away from playing sport.

Stefan Pishief, Chief Executive of Sport Gisborne Tairāwhiti says he fully supports Sport NZ’s announcement. He says, “I think it can be a game-changer for sport in our community.”

“We all have a role to play as parents, caregivers and/or coaches to encourage our young people to experience a variety of sport, rather than concentrating on one too early on.”

“This isn’t about reducing opportunities as talented children will still be able to thrive, but rather this is a movement based on long-term research, best practice and evidence.”

Nic Hendrie, Poverty Bay Cricket Association Operations Manager says the announcement is exactly the sort of initiative they are trying to promote.

Gisborne Netball Centre (GNC) has led the way by ending their year 7 and 8 representative teams in 2018. Kate Faulks, GNC Board Chair says, “We as adults need to be constantly reminded that the number one reason girls and boys play netball in New Zealand is for fun – this includes the top highly skilled players too.”

The Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union has also made a number of changes to its development programmes over the past couple of years, including shortening the junior club rugby season, removing the Under 13 representative team and changing the McDonalds Under 13 tournament to include a skills and coach development module.

Josh Willoughby, Poverty Bay Rugby Football Union Chief Executive says, “We’ve seen an increase in player numbers this year and feedback from our annual survey suggests an improved experience and environment.”

“We need to make sure we’re providing the best possible experience for children in our region. Finding the balance between having fun and winning can be difficult, but by putting the needs of young people first we can make sure they will have fun and develop their skills.”

Mr Pishief says the more young people we get participating in sports means a healthier Tairāwhiti and more young people reaching their full potential as adults.

Convert your maunga

📣 We’ve received a heap of feedback that some of our coast communities would love to get involved, but can’t make it to town often enough to participate. At the end of the day, this event is about setting a personal challenge, and getting outdoors and active with whānau. We hope that in other areas, communities can recreate that same awesome environment that Titirangi becomes during this event.

So with that in mind, you can now climb any of the awesome maunga in our region (or further afield), convert your climbs to match Titirangi – the home of the challenge, and enter them on the tracking platform along with everyone else.

To convert your climbs, you can use the handy chart below, or take the number of metres you’ve climbed (heaps of apps to find that), and divide it by 130 (that’s the height of Titirangi).
So if you climb 300 metres, you divide it by 130 (that equals 2.3), round it down because you’re honest 😉 and enter two climbs on the website.

Remember, Titirangi is a safe challenge environment. There are safety signs for cars, a one-way road and access is allowed. If you’re climbing other maunga, take safety precautions and make sure you’re allowed to be there.

Note: If you’re climbing Titirangi in Gisborne, walking from the bottom to the top, and back down counts as one climb. If you go up and over the maunga, then back again (climbing up the hill twice) that counts as two climbs.

Conversion-chart

Titirangi Mt. Everest Challenge – one-way!

One-way road

 

For your safety, the road will be made one way for the duration of the event.

With a large number of users on the road, cars travelling up and down Queens Dr has been a safety concern in previous years.

The Gisborne District Council are generously supporting the event by implementing a traffic management plan which will limit traffic to one-way only from the 23rd of September to the 10th of November.

As part of the 2016 Titirangi Reserve Management Plan, Council also made a commitment to consider future options for a one-way road and traffic calming measures. This was supported during community consultation. The Everest Challenge presents GDC the opportunity to trial a one-way road from Queens Drive to Endcliffe Road utilising temporary traffic management.